Three Non-Tarot Ways to Celebrate “World Tarot Day”

You may not have it marked on your calendar, but today is World Tarot Day!

To be perfectly honest, I didn’t know May 25th to be an important day in the Tarot world until I saw it posted by a colleague a few days ago on Facebook.

Nonetheless, World Tarot Day, established in 2003 by Den Elder,  is the perfect opportunity for us all to give some conscious attention to the Tarot: what it is, what it isn’t, why it’s still around, and how it can be used  to enhance our life.

One of the things I like the best about the Tarot is that its symbols reflect the basic truths of the universe: the archetypal forces of growth and change, the undeniable power of hope and imagination, the equipoise between the light and the dark in all its forms, the non-personal (and non-judgmental) energies of attraction and instinct, and the drive toward wholeness.

The Tarot is about Tarot, but it’s really about life, the experience of what we call “reality,” and a way to give form to the question “what the heck are we doing here?” This sweeping glance at the system supports the notion that you don’t have to be a Tarotist in order to celebrate World Tarot Day.

Herewith, then, are three non-Tarot-oriented ways to celebrate the day:

1. Look for symbols. As you go about your business during this day, pay attention to the “signs” along the way:

*Did you oversleep and arrive late to work for the third time this week?
*Did you mis-dial a phone call and end up connecting with an old friend?
*Was there a particular bumper sticker or billboard sign that caught your eye?
*Did you catch the significance of a Freudian-slip kind of typo or slip of the tongue?
*When you ran out of coffee this morning, did you suddenly remember that you were going to give up drinking coffee?

As the events of the day unfold, take the time to ask yourself, “What did that mean?” What larger truth is being expressed by these accidents of fate? It seems magical when we begin to become aware of meaningful relationships between seemingly unrelated events; this is the definition of synchronicity and one of the ways by which the Big U consistently speaks to us. I have an expression for it: “Coincidences aren’t.”

2. Listen to intuition. We have eyes and ears on the outside of our head, but we also have “inner organs of perception,” ones which, for most of us, are much less utilized.

Intuition is instinctive, but it’s been driven into the hinterlands by intellect and reason. On this World Tarot Day, lure your intuition out of the woods and into the light of day. See how you might be able tune in to this innate tool of perception:

*What do you already know without having to be told?
*Did you have an immediate “gut reaction” to anything today?
*Did certain physical aches and pains disappear at the same time as did certain people or events?
*Was there someone who brought forth a visceral reaction in you, either positive or negative?
*Did a little voice whisper in your ear? More importantly, did you pay attention?
*Was there an occasion today to say, “I knew it!”

There is much about which we have awareness that has not yet risen to the surface. Intuition holds this information for us until we shine the light of consciousness upon it. Give your intuitive muscles a break and get out your flashlight!

3. Accept your wholeness. Try not to place  a value judgment on anything today, especially yourself. Things are only “good” or “bad” if we’re attached to one experience over another. Make it a point to accept all that you are, even the parts you don’t particularly like: your strengths along with your weaknesses, where you are as well as where you’d like to be, how much you weigh, the amount of money you have … it’s all OK today, and is part of a larger picture of wholeness.

The significance of symbolic interactions; the voice of intuition; the acceptance of and the natural movement toward wholeness.
That’s the Tarot and a whole lot more, and something definitely worth celebrating.

Card image of “The World” from the Robin Wood Tarot

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1 Comment

  1. Josephine Mori said,

    May 25, 2012 at 1:19 PM

    Great post, Jeanne. Breaking new ground again, I see. Go get ’em.


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